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Dental Fractures: Why do teeth break?

These occur when we unexpectedly bite a solid and inflexible object such as a bone or a seed.

 

Teeth with carious lesions or extensive restorations are more likely to suffer from fractures. Since these do not have the same amount of enamel (hardest tooth tissue in the body) which makes the tooth more fragile. Also pieces that have received canal treatment or with large restorations with a lot of time in the oral cavity.

 

The patient's age also influences since over time the tissues that make up the tooth lose elasticity, that is, they become inflexible causing the fracture of the piece when biting a very hard food.

 

Parafunctional habits, such as bruxism. When this occurs, the patient unconsciously applies intense forces to the teeth when the jaw moves from side to side; These forces are greater than those applied during normal function. Causing abnormal wear of the teeth as well as their fracture.

 

Bruxomaniacs may feel pain or inaccurate discomfort at the end of the day, during the night or at the time of waking up. Other habits such as biting pencils, ice, nails, nails, can also be causal factors of dental fractures.

 

Now that Christmas festivities are approaching we have to be very careful with all kinds of hard foods such as: nougat, roasted pork skin, nuts among others.

 

 

 

Recommendations:

 

- Do not bite hard objects such as pens, ice, seeds, candies, etc.

 

- If you have clenching habits (bruxism), talk to your dentist so that he is treated.

 

- If you practice contact sports, use a mouth guard.

 

- Do not ignore brief, occasional pain, vague discomfort, slight sensitivity to cold or chewing. The pain of a fissured tooth or with a small fracture is usually not constant or severe.

 

If you have any of these symptoms, go quickly to your dentist.


Dr. Armellini received her dental degree from the Central University of Venezuela. She received an MBA from the University of Michigan and embarked on a clinical fellowship in Implantology Prosthodontics at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.

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