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Dental Emergency: it’s better to be prepared

 

Injuries to your gums or teeth, oral disease and other dental emergencies are something you shouldn’t ignore. They’re potentially serious and may require emergency dental care. If you ignore an oral problem, you could increase your risk of permanent damage, which may result in the need for more extensive and costly treatment later on.

 

Dental emergencies can happen so quickly that you’re not sure what just happened. One minute you’re having fun riding your bicycle, and the next minute you’re holding your tooth in your hand after it’s just been knocked out from a spill. Now you’re left wondering what you need to do next.

Accidents happen, and knowing what to do when one occurs can mean the difference between saving and losing a tooth.

Here are some tips for common dental emergencies:

-For a knocked-out permanent or adult tooth, keep it moist at all times. If you can, try placing the tooth back in the socket without touching the root. If that’s not possible, place it in between your cheek and gums, in milk, or use a tooth preservation product that has the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Then, get to your dentist’s office right away.

-For a cracked tooth, immediately rinse the mouth with warm water to clean the area. Put cold compresses on the face to keep any swelling down.

-If you bite your tongue or lip, clean the area gently with water and apply a cold compress.

-For toothaches, rinse the mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss to remove any food caught between the teeth. Do not put aspirin on the aching tooth or gum tissues.

-For objects stuck in the mouth, try to gently remove with floss but do not try to remove it with sharp or pointed instruments.

-When you have a dental emergency, it’s important to visit your dentist or an emergency room as soon as possible.

Here are some simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to the teeth:   

-Wear a mouthguard when participating in sports or recreational activities.

-Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth.

-Use scissors, NEVER your teeth, to cut things.

 

Most dentists reserve time in their daily schedules for emergency patients. Call your dentist and provide as much detail as possible about your condition.

 


Dr. Armellini received her dental degree from the Central University of Venezuela. She received an MBA from the University of Michigan and embarked on a clinical fellowship in Implantology Prosthodontics at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.

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